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Bancroft Press - Deputy Publisher

- Nationally Recognized Visual Artist, Writer, Designer, Tinkerer, Builder of Things, Do-er of Tasks - All Around Decent Guy.

The Missing Kennedy

For Immediate Release

The Missing Kennedy: What We Now Know about Rosemary Kennedy’s Life

December 19, 1961 is a date we usually pay no attention to, but it marks the date of Joe Kennedy’s stroke, and ironically the date of Rosemary Kennedy’s liberation.

Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff is the New York Times best- selling author of The Missing Kennedy.

Elizabeth started visiting Rosie Kennedy when she was 4 years old. Here is the story of the woman who became the catalyst behind the Special Olympics and related legislation from 1960 to the present.

Five Kennedy Kids

Five Kennedy Kids

Rosemary Kennedy, younger sister of President John F. Kennedy, was lobotomized in 1941 at age 23. In 1959, she was put out of public view at a remote facility in rural Wisconsin, where, for more than twenty years, she remained unvisited by family and non-family alike, until 1962.

Rosie as a freckle-faced fifteen year old

Rosie as a freckle-faced fifteen year old

Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff (Liz) and her parents were among the first non-Kennedy family members to visit Rosemary following her lobotomy. Elizabeth was niece to Rosemary’s caretaker, Sister Paulus, a Catholic nun at St. Colleta, and she visited Rosemary on a regular basis for the next thirty-four years. Through their friendship, Elizabeth discovered the person many had forgotten or never known. In 2015, ten years after Rosemary’s death, Elizabeth has come forward with a fascinating book about the hidden daughter of America’s royal Kennedy family.

The Missing Kennedy: Rosemary Kennedy and the Secret Bonds of Four Women is a truly unique, historically significant, eyewitness ac- count of Rosemary’s post-lobotomy years. It is the first book published about Rosemary by a non-family member who knew her personally, and includes nearly 100 never-before-seen pictures of Rosemary after she was lobotomized.

Rosemary (Rosie) Kennedy was born in 1918, the first daughter of a wealthy Bostonian couple who later would become known as the patriarch and matriarch of America’s most famous and celebrated family.

Jack Kennedy and Rosie

Jack Kennedy and Rosie

Elizabeth Koehler was born in 1957, the first and only child of a struggling Wisconsin farm family. Her aunt was Stella Koehler, a charismatic woman of the cloth who became Sister Paulus Koehler after taking her vows with the Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis of Assisi. For thirty-five years—indeed for much of her adult life—Sister Paulus was Rosie Kennedy’s caregiver.

Excerpt:

. . . More often than not, after Rosemary’s escape attempts were thwarted, her frustrations boiled over—she erupted into an uncontrollable tantrum. Screaming like a wild animal, she would fall to the ground, her arms and legs flailing as she kicked and cried out in rage.

Her family was astounded. Why was sweet, gentle Rosie acting this way?

There was no way for them to know Rosie’s situation had been incorrectly diagnosed. Her emotional responses aggravated a complicated under- lying condition: mental illness.

Rosie, a slow learner prone to emotional outbursts, underwent one of America’s first lobotomies—an operation Joseph Kennedy was assured would normalize Rosie’s life. It did not. Rosie’s condition became decidedly worse.

Rosie and Sister Paulus enjoy a meal

Rosie and Sister Paulus enjoy a meal

After the procedure, Joe Kennedy sent Rosie to rural Wisconsin and Saint Coletta, a Catholic-run
home for the mentally disabled.

For the next two decades, she never saw her siblings, her parents, or any other relative, the
doctors having issued stern instructions that even the occasional family visit would be emotionally
disruptive to Rosie.

Following Joseph Kennedy’s stroke in 1961, the Kennedy family, led by mother Rose and sister Eunice Kennedy Shriver, brought her out of seclusion and resumed face to face contact with Rosie. And that created the opportunity for a young Elizabeth Koehler to begin paying visits to Rosie.

Eunice Shriver with her children and Sister Paulus

Eunice Shriver with her children and Sister Paulus

In this insightful and poignant memoir, based in part on Sister Paulus’ private notes and augmented by nearly one-hundred never-before-seen photos, Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff recalls the many happy and memorable times spent with the “missing Kennedy.”

Based on independent research and interviews with the Shriver family, she tries to come to grips with Joseph Kennedy’s well-intended decision to submit his eldest daughter to a still experimental medical procedure, and his later decision to
keep Rosie almost entirely out of public view

She looks at the many parallels between Rosie’s post-operative life, her own, and those of the two
families.

Ted Kennedy and Rosie at lunch

Ted Kennedy and Rosie at lunch

And, most important, she traces how, entirely because of Rosie, the Kennedy and Shriver families embarked on an exceedingly consequential campaign advancing the cause of the developmentally disabled—a campaign that continues to this day.

Eunice Kennedy Shriver looking out at the 1968 Special Olympic Games

Eunice Kennedy Shriver looking out at the 1968 Special Olympic Games

Book Details

The Missing Kennedy Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff Oct 2015

The Missing Kennedy
Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff
Oct 2015

The Missing Kennedy:
Rosemary Kennedy and the Secret Bonds of Four Women
Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff

List $27.50 Hardcover/ 6×9,
Also available as ebook and audiobook 270 pages, including over 125 photos
ISBN 978-1-61088-174-6 (cloth)
Published by Bancroft Press October 1, 2015

The inspiration behind The Special Olympics and The Best Buddies program, Rosemary Kennedy led a
very meaningful life because of how her family responded to her misfortune. Revealing a very
personal look into Rosie’s tragic yet inspiring life, Elizabeth Koehler-Pen- tacoff shares the
impact Rosemary had on her life and the life of so many others. She tells a sad story, yet a very
intimate and uplifting one as well.

For more information visit http://missingkennedy.com/

 

Author Elizabeth Koehler Pentacoff

Author Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff

Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff is a former columnist for Byline Magazine. She wrote frequent humor pieces for the San Francis- co Examiner as well as hundreds of articles and essays in news- papers and magazines such as Parents Magazine, Writer’s Digest, and Parenting.

With degrees in Liberal Studies and Theater Arts/Children’s Theater and two teaching credentials, she’s directed plays and taught elementary and middle school students, as well as teachers. A speaker for international and state conferences, she presents assemblies and workshops for schools and libraries.

Born in rural Wisconsin, Liz moved to California for all of her college and post-graduate education, and has lived most of her adult life in the San Francisco area. She is married and has one grown child.

What People Are Saying

“Aunt Rosemary inspired so many to work against injustice and ignorance. Her struggle and her
immense legacy will be felt and celebrated by reading this exceptional book.”
—Bobby Shriver

“…this poignant look at the life of a lesser-known yet remarkable Kennedy, with its dozens of
never-before-pub- lished photos, is sure to resonate with enthusiasts of this influential family.”
—Library Journal

“Reveals an untold chapter in the Kennedy saga . . . Also shows how knowledge of Rosie’s disability
led to the founding of the Special Olympics by Eunice Kennedy . . . Provides a few interesting
glimpses into one member of the Kennedy clan who was almost lost to her family.”
—Kirkus Reviews

“Koehler-Pentacoff ’s book offers an intimate glance at the sheltered life that Rosemary lived
while her glamorous family grew in prestige and power . . . Heads in the welcome direction of
telling the largely untold story of Rose- mary Kennedy, and the story of the intellectually
challenged and their allies in the fight to place them as equal members of society.”
—Irish America

“Anyone in the world who’s interested in the famous Kennedy family will find this fascinating
memoir to be es- sential reading. Rosemary Kennedy was the least known member of the family but, it
turns out, one of the most significant in the big scheme of things. If you don’t read The Missing
Kennedy, you won’t know a critical and en- lightening part of the Kennedy story.”
—Dr. Abe Bortz, American Historian
“Such a touching book!”
—People Magazine
“Fascinating story!”
—BBC World News Service (Claire Marshall, “Newsday”)
“This is an important and encouraging book. The author tells the story of Rosemary Kennedy
(1918-2005) from a personal perspective. In this remarkable account, the grace of God ripples
through the pages …”
—Christine Sutherland, Managing Editor, American Church Union, The Publishing House of the Anglican
Province of Christ the King

Can we interest you in a feature story, book review, or interview with Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff,
the New York Times bestselling author of The Missing Kennedy?

She is available for in-person interviews in San Francisco, California and by phone everywhere else by arrangement. If you wish to receive a review copy, please verify your best mailing address.
—Paul Krupin and Isabella Michon, Publicists for Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff
Review copies, photography, and interviews are available upon request.
Feature story inquiries welcomed and appreciated.
Contact: Isabella Michon 415- 898-4838 // im.media@comcast.net
Or simply hit reply to this email.

Both Sides of the Line

The True Story of a Life-Changing Football Mentor Who Became a Longtime Target of America’s Most Wanted

Kevin Kelly July 2016

Kevin Kelly
July 2016

A Story of Good and Evil, of Right and Wrong, of an Inspiring Football Coach, and of a Mobster Turned Murderer.

Everyone comes in shades of gray, with a forward face and one kept in shadow. What happens when the darkness takes over, when action overrides intention, when what is done cannot be undone?

Kevin Kelly’s Both Sides of the Line tells the story of Jack Clyde Dempsey, a football coach at a Catholic school in Boston who forever changed the lives of countless young men. He brought unity and discipline to a motley group of inner city boys for whom football was a means to escape the many challenges of home life. With a reputation for toughness and unrelenting determination, Dempsey insisted that what he called “the Holy Trinity” of football—quickness, technique, and desire—would trump size and stature every time. And with this message and the success it wrought, he turned kids into believers.

More than winners, his boys became teammates who supported one another. And while his team, his football family, quickly came to respect him for his unwavering faith in their potential, the truth was Dempsey’s storied and mythic “dark side” had preceded him. While revered by the streetwise boys before they ever laid eyes on him, Dempsey revealed in time an unapologetically volatile temper, and his whispered-about dealings with the local mob fed the rumor mill of Don Bosco High.

But when a player was paralyzed in part due to Dempsey’s bad call on the field, linebacker Kevin Kelly begins to reconsider his devotion to the game of football. And though Dempsey stayed on as their coach, the memory of a crippled teammate lingered
for decades.

In the fall of 1974, with team morale at an all-time low, Dempsey’s relentless drive for perfection led his undersized charges to a championship season—the first and only title in the Catholic Conference that Don Bosco’s football team would ever know. The crown became the driving force for many players’ self-esteem and confidence, as well as for their college and career success.

For Dempsey, however, it became the towering peak from which he would tragically spiral, crashing in a blast of violence that ended another life. A football coach who preached God, family, and country, and the need to live a clean, drug-free life, allowed his penchant for drinking and cocaine to finally bring him down.

That was when the hunt for Jack Clyde Dempsey, fugitive, began.

This is the remarkable story of an unlikely team of champions from some of the roughest parts of Boston, and of the coach who inspired and shaped their futures. He gave them the strength to stand together, even as he self-destructed.

This is Kevin Kelly’s memoir of Jack Dempsey: The man who played on Both Sides of the Line.

The Missing Kennedy

The Missing Kennedy

Rosemary Kennedy and the Secret Bonds of Four Women

Oct 2015
$27.50




 

Featured in People Magazine, the Daily Mail UK, and more.

Press Kit for THE MISSING KENNEDY

Rosemary (Rosie) Kennedy was born in 1918, the first daughter of a wealthy Bostonian couple who later would become known as the patriarch and matriarch of America’s most famous and celebrated family.

Elizabeth Koehler was born in 1957, the first and only child of a struggling Wisconsin farm family.
What, besides their religion, did these two very different Catholic women have in common?
One person really: Stella Koehler, a charismatic woman of the cloth who became Sister Paulus Koehler after taking her vows with the Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis of Assisi.
Sister Paulus was Elizabeth’s Wisconsin aunt. For thirty-five years―indeed much of her adult life―Sister Paulus was Rosie Kennedy’s caregiver.

And a caregiver, tragically, had become necessary after Rosie, a slow learner prone to emotional outbursts, underwent one of America’s first lobotomies―an operation Joseph Kennedy was assured would normalize Rosie’s life. It did not. Rosie’s condition became decidedly worse.

After the procedure, Joe Kennedy sent Rosie to rural Wisconsin and Saint Coletta, a Catholic-run home for the mentally disabled. For the next two decades, she never saw her siblings, her parents, or any other relative, the doctors having issued stern instructions that even the occasional family visit would be emotionally disruptive to Rosie.

Following Joseph Kennedy’s stroke in 1961, the Kennedy family, led by mother Rose and sister Eunice Kennedy Shriver, resumed face to face contact with Rosie.

It was also about then that a young Elizabeth Koehler began paying visits to Rosie.
In this insightful and poignant memoir, based in part on Sister Paulus’ private notes and augmented by nearly one-hundred never-before-seen photos, Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff recalls the many happy and memorable times spent with the “missing Kennedy.”

Based on independent research and interviews with the Shriver family, she tries to come to grips with Joseph Kennedy’s well-intended decision to submit her eldest daughter to a still experimental medical procedure, and his later decision to keep Rosie almost entirely out of public view.

She looks at the many parallels between Rosie’s post-operative life, her own, and those of the two families.

And, most important, she traces how, entirely because of Rosie, the Kennedy and Shriver families embarked on an exceedingly consequential campaign advancing the cause of the developmentally disabled―a campaign that continues to this day.

Ten years after Rosie’s death comes a highly personal yet fitting testimonial to a sad but truly meaningful and important life.

Advance Praise for The Missing Kennedy

“Aunt Rosemary inspired so many to work against injustice and ignorance. Her struggle and her immense legacy will be felt and celebrated by reading this exceptional book.”
―BOBBY SHRIVER

“Reveals an untold chapter in the Kennedy saga . . . Also shows how knowledge of Rosie’s disability led to the founding of the Special Olympics by Eunice Kennedy . . . Provides a few interesting glimpses into one member of the Kennedy clan who was almost lost to her family.”
―KIRKUS REVIEWS

The Missing Kennedy is a truly inspiring story. It captures my Aunt Rosie’s spirit so well. I especially love how it intertwines the stories about Rosie and the author’s Aunt Stella. And it provides some great glimpses into the author’s experiences with both of them.”
―ANTHONY SHRIVER

“Poignantly discloses our nation’s shortcomings, both historically and contemporarily, when it comes to understanding the mentally ill and intellectually challenged. Also reveals the dearth of research concerning the women of the Kennedy family, which pales in comparison to the body of work focused on its men . . . This is especially true of Rosemary Kennedy, the eldest Kennedy sister, who was lobotomized and kept from her family and the public eye for over 20 years . . . It was the author’s aunt, Sister Paulus, who was Rosemary Kennedy’s caretaker at Saint Coletta, where Rosemary was kept for many years after her lobotomy only exacerbated her intellectual and emotional challenges . . . Koehler-Pentacoff’s book offers an intimate glance at the sheltered life that Rosemary lived while her glamorous family grew in prestige and power . . . Heads in the welcome direction of telling the largely untold story of Rosemary Kennedy, and the story of the intellectually challenged and their allies in the fight to place them as equal members of society.”
―IRISH AMERICA

“Anyone in the world who’s interested in the famous Kennedy family will find this fascinating memoir to be essential reading. Rosemary Kennedy was the least known member of the family but, it turns out, one of the most significant in the big scheme of things. If you don’t read The Missing Kennedy, you won’t know a critical and enlightening part of the Kennedy story.”
―DR. ABE BORTZ, AMERICAN HISTORIAN

The Gospel of the Twin

Ron Cooper  2016

Ron Cooper
2016

An ancient legend says that Jesus had a twin brother, Thomas. An extra-Biblical text that dates from perhaps as early as the late first century CE (which would make it the same age as the Biblical Gospels) claims to be the secret teachings of Jesus as recorded by “Judas Didymos Thomas.” The Greek word “Didymos” and the Aramaic word “Thomas” both mean “twin.”

While only several Greek fragments of this manuscript, dating to the early second century CE, actually exist, a manuscript written in Coptic from the fourth century was discovered in 1945. This Gospel of Thomas contains 114 purported sayings of Jesus, many of which resemble passages in the New Testament.

Drawing upon years of extensive research in early Jewish and Christian history and recent work on the historical Jesus, acclaimed novelist Ron Cooper focuses on Thomas of Nazareth, old and bitter after years of self-imposed exile from his homeland, who returns to Jerusalem to write a book about his identical twin brother Jesus. Disgusted by how others have perverted his brother’s message, Thomas wants to set the record straight. But in doing so, he must try to unravel the enigma that was Jesus.

Provocative, inventive, and sure to be controversial, The Gospel of the Twin draws upon scriptural and ancient, non-Biblical sources to present an imaginative version of the founding of Christianity through scenes of violence, tenderness, and mistaken identity that will change the way the world thinks about Jesus.

For fans of such books as Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth by Reza Aslan, Killing Jesus by Bill O’Reilly, and even such Dan Brown novels as The Da Vinci Code, Cooper’s The Gospel of the Twin will also appeal to readers of such sophisticated Bible scholars as Bart Erhman, Marcus Borg, John Dominic Crossan, and Elaine Pagels, all of whom have written academic works as well as books more accessible to the general reader.

With The Gospel of the Twin, Cooper provides a potentially controversial, compellingly human, and thoroughly readable page-turner―his own brilliant version of what many call “the greatest story ever told.”

Praise for Ron Cooper’s The Gospel of the Twin

 

“Stepping up to the task of reimagining Jesus Christ, Cooper (Purple Jesus) gives him a twin brother, Thomas, and borrows from the non-canonical Gospel of Thomas and other ancient writings to spin a satisfying tale of an enigmatic, wandering spiritual teacher and his followers. Jesus is charismatic, a touch simple-minded, and given to poetry and metaphor, while his twin is a realist, observing with open eyes the duplicity of Jesus’s followers, chiefly Peter and Judas, as they spin Jesus’s actions into miracles. It’s good biblical fiction unhampered by conservative religious sensitivities.”

―Publishers Weekly

 

“A compelling and imaginative story of Jesus’s life . . . A thoroughly accessible, page-turning adventure marked by the same well-crafted prose of Cooper’s other works . . . A deeply thoughtful and thoroughly researched story, one worth a careful reading and time spent in reflection. Cooper’s provocative interpretations are sure to anger some readers and intrigue others . . . Whether we accept this version of Jesus’s life or not, the novel challenges us to examine our beliefs and the meaning of our lives, a journey into the deep every mature adult must undertake. Even without the magic of miracles, the philosophies attributed to Jesus remain powerful and no less relevant today than in his lifetime.”

―Southern Literary Review

 

“If you’ve ever wanted to know the inside story of Jesus of Nazareth, and feel unsated by all available accounts, then you should direct your attention at once to both the oldest and newest source―Thomas, Jesus’s wizened and jaded twin brother, who seeks to part the waters of myth and distortion when it comes to his sibling and limn a portrait that gets to the heart and soul of who and what he’s all about. In this tour de force, Ron Cooper builds on his previous spellbinding works, and at the same time shifts gears radically, to spin a mesmerizing tale about Jesus as told through his identical twin’s eyes. ‘I may be further from the truth than when I began,’ Thomas concludes near the end of this tale that treats timeless themes of identity and alienation, of betrayal and overcoming. Yet the heart-rending and mind-bending truths conveyed in this work―a product of extraordinary research, of a most fertile imagination, and of a writer at the top of his game―will have you returning to it time and again.”

―Christopher Phillips, author, Socrates Cafe: A Fresh Taste of Philosophy

 

The Gospel of the Twin is beautifully written, smart, gripping, and richly textured. It’s also unlike any other novel I know. Cooper is a superb writer, and a daring one too, and I hope this deeply-felt book receives every ounce of acclaim it deserves. I’ll never forget reading it.”

―Steve Yarbrough, Professor of Writing at Emerson College, and Author of Nine Published short story collections and Novels, Including Prisoners of War, A Pen/Faulkner Finalist

 

The Gospel of the Twin is first and foremost an enthralling story about figures many of us have long known in other guises and from other accounts. Ron Cooper has drawn them again, placing them in bright historical framework and spiritual perspective, and illumining them as vivid personalities. He has also offered a new and deeply plausible interpretation of traditional gospel materials. Quite an achievement!”

Fred Chappell, Winner of the Prix de Meilleur des Livres Etrangers, the Bollingen Prize, and the T. S. Eliot Prize

 

Hillary Rodham Clinton: On The Couch

Who exactly is Hillary Clinton?

Because as her candidacy for President has been announced ahead of 2016, and she could well become the first woman ever to be U.S. President, the question becomes all the more relevant … and important.

Fortunately, woman’s biographer Alma H. Bond, a Manhattan psychoanalyst for 35 years, has read just about everything ever published about the former First Lady, U.S. Senator, and Secretary of State, and has written a fascinating, highly readable, and intimate book burning through a great many myths about HRC.

Hillary Clinton: On The Couch July 2015

Hillary Clinton: On The Couch
July 2015

PRAISE FOR HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON ON THE COUCH

“Every American should read this book, as should every world leader. In fact, so should the people in every country around the world, because it seems evident to me that she will be America’s next president.”
―DR. ABE BORTZ, HISTORIAN

“With her most recent tome, Hillary Rodham Clinton On The Couch, Dr. Alma H. Bond has once again used her skills as a psychoanalyst, combined them with extensive research, and put together a fascinating look at the life of her subject, this time the former first lady, Hillary Rodham Clinton . . . She has skillfully assembled a vivid chronicle of a strong woman who has faced immense challenges throughout her life and was able to pull through no matter how painful the journey. Bond’s take on the details of this captivating woman are compelling and convincing, even if you, like many, don’t like Hillary and, as many will do, question her accomplishments if she decides to run for President.”
―NORM GOLDMAN, PUBLISHER, BOOKPLEASURES.COM

“In the fourth installment of her ‘On the Couch’ series, famed female biographer Dr. Alma Bond looks inside the head and life of the presidential frontrunner and informs voters what she’s found. This is the most original concept I’ve come across! And what an extraordinary read! I felt like a fly on the wall in Dr. Darcy Dale’s office, as the author has a gift for depicting a situation as if it is actually occurring. Every chapter was an open doorway to a room full of intimate details about the former First Lady, which made the sessions more realistic. From birth to Benghazi, and beyond, this novel explores Clinton in a most enjoyable, and sometimes heartbreaking, manner. I’m not a colossal fan of politics, but Hillary Rodham Clinton has always intrigued me. I’ve read several articles in the past, but her story has more depth than I originally considered. The bibliography is quite extensive; therefore, this was getting several points of reference at once. When you consider what this woman has been through and how she persevered, it’s hard not to admire her. Alma H. Bond, Ph.D. has delivered a powerful interpretation of an enigmatic figure! An extraordinary book and a great read. I think it’s brilliant!”
―LITERARY MELTING POT

“Hillary Clinton comes for psychiatric help in dealing with her husband’s latest affair. Dr. Darcy Dale encourages her to open up and to reveal her past —the good and the bad. Much information about the First Lady is revealed during these fictionalized sessions. RESULT: An in-depth and detailed look at the life of Hillary in a way that’s more interesting than a typical biography/autobiography because the author is really able to make Hillary come to life and seem human. She’s more than the nickname she was given during her early years ―”Sister Frigidaire.” She has many emotions and even cries, not only during sessions, but states she cried during other difficult points in her life. She’s funny, a bit sarcastic, and very intelligent. Bond provides interesting insights into what Hillary could have been thinking about this or that, and the state of her mind from a psychoanalyst’s point of view. It’s easy to get to know Hillary and want to hear her story.”
―BOOK READERS

“There have been so many books written about our former First Lady of Arkansas, First Lady of our country, Senator, and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Not all put her in a good light, I might add. If you look at the picture on the cover of this book, you will see an older lady. The lines on her face are there because she has given almost her whole life to helping others. Look into her eyes and you will find the love she has for our country and her family. The author shows us what has made her the woman she is today, starting from her early years growing up with her parents. Her father ruled with an iron hand. He made no concessions when it came to his children. Hillary was the only girl but was treated like her brothers in many ways. When it came to school work, a B was not accepted in the Rodham home. It had to be all A’s. I lived in Arkansas for a few years and read what reporters said about her. She was ripped apart on many things―everything from the way she dressed, to why she put up with Bill Clinton and his women. Hillary is a strong woman, but she is human just like the rest of us. She feels pain; she cries when no one is around. People seem to forget her many accomplishments. This book has opened my eyes so that I can see who, and why, Hillary is the person she is, and how she has managed to overcome so many obstacles that have come her way. In my own opinion, some men are intimidated by her. Hillary has never been one to pull any punches that are thrown at her. Who has the most experience to become our next President? Who has the tenacity to fight in a man’s world when it comes to the women of America? Who is the person who will admit when she is wrong? If she runs, count on this Republican to vote for her.”
―MIDWEST BOOK REVIEW

“Who exactly is Mrs. Hillary Rodham Clinton? The chances that she will become the first woman running for the presidency make this question all the more relevant. To portray this woman’s character, author Alma H. Bond Ph.D. has created a series of sessions that Mrs. Clinton had with a Dr. Darcy Dale, a fictitious psychoanalyst. The result is simple, fluent, and interesting.”
― IZAK COHEN, OWNER, UNLIMITED JEANS COMPANY, NEW YORK, NY

“This is quite an entertaining book. It relates the life of Hillary Clinton through imagined therapy sessions. You obviously need to suspend belief slightly for the book to work, but if you do, it’s quite enjoyable. The story is told almost entirely through Hillary’s monologues to her therapist, in big paragraphs interspersed with small insights from the analyst. The combination is a somewhat lighthearted but interesting view of Hillary the person.”
―ELLIE WRIGHT, ON SHADOW.COM

“I just finished reading/reviewing Alma Bond’s book on Hillary and, as always, she’s to be congratulated on doing a fantastic job. It was so thoroughly believable that, at times, I had to pinch myself to remember that it was a book of fiction as well as non-fiction. I found myself hating Hillary’s cruel father and wondered how much of that depiction was true. At times, I also found Hillary, whom I admire tremendously, to be pompous, although, given what she’s accomplished, she deserves to be full of herself. On the other hand, she’s portrayed as having gotten through her unhappy childhood successfully, due to her beloved mother’s full support and encouragement. It is a GREAT book, and I encourage all journalists to read it as soon as it’s out, especially if they tend toward voting Republican.”
―ARLINE ZAKS, AUTHOR OF NUMEROUS BOOKS, INCLUDING HORSING AROUND IN NEW JERSEY, AND A LONGTIME MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF JOURNALISTS AND AUTHORS

“What an amazing book! Dr. Bond really gets into the mind of her subjects, and this one on Hillary Rodham Clinton is no exception. The reader can easily imagine Clinton sitting in a comfortable chair across from the imaginary Dr. Dale, spilling her heart and her secrets, a cup of tea beside her, and her smartphone carefully switched off for 50 minutes at a time. But that doesn’t mean there’s no meat here. Bond’s portrayal of Clinton delves into her background, her relationship with Bill (with all of its ups and downs), her years as a lawyer and as the family breadwinner, and how she feels about motherhood—and grandmotherhood. Bond’s earlier books dealt with women who have already entered into history; Clinton is her first one dealing with a living person. As such, it’s easy to see that Dr. Dale is a Hillary Clinton fan for the most part. Political junkies, have no fear, though: Despite Bond’s meticulous research, the book is unlikely to change anyone’s mind regarding Clinton. If you already support the former first lady, senator, and secretary of state, you’ll come away feeling good about that decision. If you don’t, you’ll probably find ammunition to support your view as well, which probably just goes to show that Bond’s background in psychology gives her an even keel from which to steer her psychoanalytical boat. In any event, it’s a fascinating read about a young, socially inept girl who grew into an accomplished, driven woman. Even if you thought you knew Hillary, this will probably still be an eye-opener.”
―ANN BEARDSLEY, AUTHOR, HISTORICAL DICTIONARY OF NASA AND THE SPACE PROGRAM (FORTHCOMING)

 

 

TITLE INFORMATION

ISBNs: 978-1-61088-164-7 hardcover
978-1-61088-167-8 epub
978-1-61088-166-1 Kindle
TITLE: Hillary Rodham Clinton On the Couch
AUTHOR’S LAST NAME: Bond
AUTHOR’S FIRST NAME: Dr. Alma H.
EXACT NAME OF PUBLISHER: Bancroft Press
PUBLISHER PHONE NUMBER: 410-358-0658
PUBLISHER WEBSITE: www.bancroftpress.com
PUBLISHER E-MAIL ADDRESS: bruceb@bancroftpress.com
PUBLICATION DATE: June 30, 2015
PRICES: $25.00 (hardcover), $9.99 (ebooks)
NUMBER OF PAGES: 285
SUBJECTS/TOPICS OF BOOK: Biography/Politics/Public Affairs/Historical Fiction

Press Kit for Hillary Clinton On the Couch 

mehlman debut novel

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AFTERSHOCK. July 4, 2014

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Major Penelope Baldwin, accomplished pilot and tactician, could have expected a bright future and stable military career until a dubious flight mission over Al A’Zamiyah, Iraq results in the loss of her left leg, and any opportunity for motherhood.

As Penelope struggles in recovery, her mother Evelyn struggles to secure their financial future and cover mounting medical bills. Buying the lies of disingenuous bankers and marketing shills, Evelyn places her savings within the derivatives market, a bubble that (unbeknownst to her) is on the verge of bursting. The collapse will destroy what’s left of her finances, along with the investments and pensions of countless citizens.

Within months, on a wintry night in Georgia, a coked-up stock trader miscalculates a power turn in a Porsche coupe, sending its right front wheel over the curb and crashing into that which Penelope holds most dear.

The stage is set for a dedicated warrior, an American heroine, to turn her sights on those greedy, callous men responsible for ripping away her future.

Baldwin, along with Tessa Montgomery (Senior Chief USMC), Cynthia Washington (RN MSW), and six other highly competent women, all similarly devastated by the avarice, arrogance, and indifference of America’s ruling elite, channel their grief and rage, and their search for justice, to become a finely orchestrated and well-financed band of predators.

Several months later, several of the most powerful of America’s financial and political elite are slaughtered in forty-storied monuments to their egos. Then a terror―a terror so primal that it rends the very fabric of everyday life―is released into the homes, limos, and private jets of America’s quasi-monarchical class.

An invisible society of professional predators is leading a lethal attack on the long sacred relationship between money and politics. Two critical questions are explicitly raised by the attackers: When the voice of the few, the wealthy, the privileged is the sound of the money essential for election, can the voice of the common citizen be heard at all? Can an ethical government exist when the special interests it’s charged with policing have captured the political system and the means of election through their vast wealth?

How will the country’s people, political leaders, and top business executives respond? Find out by reading Aftershock, a heart-thumping fictional thriller by debut novelist Joe Lane.

Joe Lane on the inspiration behind Aftershock:

“The more I learned, the more it seemed that only some truly radical change in the funding of our political system is necessary to prevent the complete erosion of our fundamental democratic institutions. The solution the women push for is the only one I believe can overpower money’s stranglehold on our democracy. As long as we continue to permit the individuals and organizations with the most money to have the loudest voice in our government, we are doomed to a continued cycle of financial booms and busts where those with all that money get even more money and the rest of us get stuck with the bill for their skullduggery and collusion.

As Penelope and her band of dark hearted heroines say, ‘Public funding of the entire electoral and governing processes, with very long, very sharp teeth for those who violate it, is the only avenue we everyday citizens can travel where our voice matters.’ If we do not get private money out of the hands of politicians and political parties, that private wealth in the hands of individuals and corporations will continue to bend the system to its will for its exclusive benefit.”

Praise for AFTERSHOCK.

Aftershock will take you on a thrill ride you’ll remember for a long time. The tension Joe Lane creates throughout the book is palpable. The characters seem real. The events feel like they really happen. And the overall experience makes for a great read!”
—Ruben Moreno, Real estate developer and electronics investor-developer, Brookline, MA

“Joe Lane is so successful in making truth and fiction ambiguous that it’s difficult to believe the assassins of Aftershock aren’t already amongst us. The planning and execution of the Wa women is so unbelievably plausible that one can imagine the NSA scrambling to beef up its counter-terrorism intelligence-gathering efforts after reading this book. By interweaving elements and consequences of the 2008 financial crisis into the plot, Lane’s produced a story that will keep your imagination engaged and goosebumps on your skin until the very last sentence.”
—Dr. Kwan Skinner, Specialist, Material Science, Fortune 100 Firm

“Can an ethical government exist when the special interests it’s charged with policing use their vast wealth to buy politicians, elections, public policy, and impunity from prosecution for their rampant massive criminality? Joe Lane’s Aftershock answers with a resounding no in a fanciful yet ferocious look at the bloody retribution righteously exacted by a fistful of pissed-off but highly proficient femmes who hope to improve the future by violently disrupting the cynical, corrupt status quo.”
—Rick Rosenthal, Production Counsel, Emmett-Furla Films

“As a foreigner, I didn’t know all that much about how the Yanks managed to cause so much financial havoc back in 2008. Aftershock provides the kind of detail you’d expect to laboriously pull out of an investigative financial piece. And the author does it in a way that makes it almost impossible to put the book down once you get started.”
—Sam Wei, Senior Manager, Xue Er Sheng Enterprises, Guangdong Province, China

“Joe Lane’s Aftershock is an action-packed and provoking novel that illustrates what happens when people are pushed too far by corrupt politicians and bankers. This country’s financial apartheid and widening chasms of wealth are caused by epidemic levels of fraud in mortgage banking. Real and ordinary people are hurt by predatory lending, foreclosures, and investments.
—Sheri Lutz, independent bookseller, Minneapolis, MN

Aftershock, a sensational thriller, flips the script of the 2008 financial crisis, turning the powerless into the powerful and the hunters into the hunted. Set in a political and economic landscape of corruption and inequality very much like our own, a band of female assassins quite literally go for the throats of the political and economic elite, acting out the collective rage we know so well. With unexpected turns, Aftershock sends a wave of adrenaline to the head as our darkest impulses seem more heroic than we may have guessed. With action that’s paramount throughout the novel, author Joe Lane pushes us to brazenly identify with a bloody resistance, and makes us realize that the merciless fight for change may end up being a zero sum game.”
—Matthew Sonnenshein, Internet and marketing specialist, New York City

“The author’s way of writing had me stuck to my seat, unable to put the book down. The characters are so convincing, it’s sometimes hard to accept the fact that they don’t actually exist. The story is violent and clever in every way possible. Result? Readers are kept on edge, wondering what’s going to happen next. There are so many twists and turns you’ll be both shocked and amazed.”
—Dave Buick, Scotland

“Great read. Very tense and fast-paced. Loved it!”
—Robert O’Connor, Film-maker, and Co-Director and founder, FilmOneFest

Aftershock brings to life characters and scenarios that many of us wish existed, even if we dare not admit it to ourselves. Joe Lane does more than give us a ‘what if’ situation; he challenges us to reconsider what is truly right and wrong, and pushes the reader to reexamine a fundamentally flawed system that protects the powerful and punishes the weak. Don’t be afraid to read it.”
—Dr. Marc Liu, Internet Marketing, New York, NY

“Joe Lane’s Aftershock provides a new perspective on terrorism, fleshing out a motivation (dare I say justification?) that may resonate with Western readers in a manner all too disturbing. Above all, Aftershock does what the best of political thrillers impel you to do: turn the pages to find out what happens next.”
—Dr. Jon Owen Marks, CEO, Allied Urological Services, LLC, New York, NY

Mark Falkin

Mark Falkin

Mark Falkin

Born and raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Mark Falkin graduated from Southern Methodist University in Dallas and then the University of Oklahoma College of Law. He has lived in Texas for the last twenty years, where he is a literary agent and recovering music attorney, having represented platinum sellers and Grammy winners alike.

His 2006 self-published novel, Days of Grace, was optioned for a film and nominated for a literary award, The Needle Award, at POD-dy Mouth blog, where the reviewer said, “This is literature at its best . . . Falkin could easily be likened to the aforementioned Lethem or to Augusten Burroughs or even J.D. Salinger,” and Bookpeople in Austin noted, “Here’s more proof that Austin is home to some of the best new writers around . . . Falkin’s novel is reminiscent of the writing style found in Lethem, Sedaris, Coupland, and Kerouac, with his sharp wit and journalistic style.”

Working on his next book, he lives with his wife and family in Austin, where he reads, coaches recreational soccer, tries to find time to paddle Texas waters, and keeps a sharp eye on his young daughters, snatching hugs here and there.

John C. Hampsey

John C. Hampsey

John C. Hampsey

John C. Hampsey is professor of Romantic and Classical Literature at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, where he has won the University Distinguished Teaching Award. Previously, he taught at Boston University and MIT. He received his BA from Holy Cross College and his PhD from Boston College.

 

His book, Paranoia and Contentment: A Personal Essay on Western Thought (2005, University of Virginia Press) won enthusiastic endorsements from fellow writers Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Tim O’Brien. O’Brien judged Paranoia and Contentment to be “sharply reasoned and intellectually bold . . . This beautifully written book turns upside down our standard thinking about creativity, imagination, and what it is to be wholly human.” Paranoia and Contentment was the first book to view paranoia in a positive light, and to use the concept to re-examine Western thought.

 

Professor Hampsey’s memoir Kaufman’s Hill (Bancroft Press, hardcover, January 2015) is set in Pittsburgh between 1961-68. It begins when the narrator is seven years old and focuses on that threshold time between the late 1950s and the full counter-cultural world that arrived after 1968, as well as on the graphic yet mythical world of boyhood that vanishes right into the twilight. Each chapter, in fact, has a key scene occurring at twilight.

 

Howard Zinn, after reading an early draft of Kaufman’s Hill, called it “the best book on American boyhood in decades.” Of Kaufman’s Hill, another reader says it”touches on something about boyhood within the expansiveness of life that I can’t remember anyone doing, especially not with your voice and perspective.” Another early reader asserts that “the book captures the dynamics of the lost world of boyhood with sensitivity but without sentimentality, in a way no one has before.” “It is an American Angela’s Ashes,” suggests yet another pre-publication reader.

 

The Gettysburg Review is publishing an excerpt from Kaufman’s Hill in Autumn 2014.

 

Professor Hampsey is currently working on a novel—Soda Lake, an existential mystery mixed with interconnected imaginary portraits. The Alaska Quarterly has recently agreed to publish an excerpt.

 

During his career, Hampsey has had more than thirty stories and essays published in such places as The Gettysburg Review (four times), The Midwest Quarterly, Antioch Review, The Alaska Quarterly, The Boston Globe, Arizona Quarterly, European Romantic Review, Witness, Colby Quarterly, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and McNeese Review, among many others.

 

He lives in San Luis Obispo, Califorinia, with his wife and daughter.

 

Hampsey will begin a national tour of readings for Kaufman’s Hill in January 2015. For information on that tour, or to arrange a reading, please contact Bancroft Press publisher Bruce Bortz (bruceb@bancroftpress.com) or the author directly at jhampsey@calpoly.edu.

Kaufman’s Hill

Kaufman's Hill January 2015

John C. Hampsey
February 2015




$25.00

 

 

 

            A PROFOUND AND INTENSELY MOVING BOYHOOD MEMOIR

Novelist Tim O’Brien says that “Kaufman’s Hill is among the most touching, sensitive, and spellbinding memoirs I’ve encountered in many years. Beautifully and exactly written, this book will surely reach into the hearts of its readers. I was deeply moved.”

Kaufman’s Hill opens with a prosaic neighborhood scene: The author and some other young boys are playing by the creek, one of their usual stomping grounds. But it soon becomes clear that much more is going on; the boy-narrator is struggling to find his way in a middle-class Catholic neighborhood dominated by bullies, the Creelys, who often terrify him. It’s the Pittsburgh of the early and mid-1960s, a threshold time just before the full counter culture arrives, and a time when suburban society begins to encroach on Kaufman’s Hill, the boy’s sanctuary and the setting of many of his adventures. As the hill and the 1950s vanish into the twilight, so does the world of the narrator s boyhood.

“My pappy says if you re going to be afraid of everything, you may as well live in the sewer” are the words that first open the narrator’s eyes. And once he befriends the enigmatic, erratic, but charismatic Taddy Keegan, he becomes bolder and no longer lives in abject fear of the Creelys. The narrator’s relationship with Taddy proves to be unconventional, though. Taddy, caught in his own imaginary universe, is often unaware of companions around him and lives life as if he is a performer.

The narrator’s world is a mix of exhilarating freedom because of absent parents, teachers, and priests and imminent dangers. This is what an American childhood used to be like, one reviewer claims, before it was organized out of existence: an anarchic voyage into the unknown realms of human possibility.

At home, the narrator’s life is problematic. He observes his taciturn father as he copes with manic behaviors and cyclically repeating problems, while his mother struggles to better the life not just of her young son, but that of her African American cleaning woman in a time of racial animosity and racially-related urban violence.

As the narrator matures, his self-concept shifts within a widening world that includes disconcerting sexual experiences with public school girls, and his struggle to frame himself within the realm of the Catholic Church. He finds flaws with all but one religious figure, an aunt, who is a sublime and mystical presence in his life. When he begins high school, the narrator, at a dramatic moment, leaves boyhood behind, which might include leaving Taddy Keegan behind as well.

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