Calvert the Raven Lesson Guide from the Maryland State Department of Education; A Valuable Resource for Teachers

Calvert The Raven J. Scott Fuqua
Calvert The Raven
J. Scott Fuqua

We would like to give a special Thank You to the Maryland State Department of Education for reading, reviewing, recommending and creating resources for this book! We sincerely hope that children of all ages will find the Calvert the Raven in the Battle of Baltimore as exciting as history itself!

Teachers please click below for the free pdf download of the Calvert the Raven Lesson Guide, including images, tables, and activities.

Calvert the Raven Lesson Guide from MDE 072313

 

 

Below is a sample of some pages from the Lesson Guide:

Grade/Course

4/5

Unit

History/MD History

Lesson Title

Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore

Essential Questions

How am I connected to those in the past?

Enduring Understanding

Knowledge of the past helps one understand the present and make decisions about the future.

State Standards

History

D2.HIS.3-5 Explain probable causes and effects of events and developments

Geography

D2.GEO.3-5 Construct maps and other graphic representations of both familiar and unfamiliar places.

Common Core Standards

Reading

Grade 4 CCSS ELA-Literacy RL4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when

                                                                  drawing inferences from the text.

Grade 5 CCSS ELA-Literacy RL5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and drawing           

                                                                  inferences from the text.

Writing

Grade 4/5 CCSS ELA-Literacy  W4/5.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and        

                                                                           information clearly.

Speaking and Listening

Grade 4/5 CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL 4/5.4 Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using

                                                                           appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes;        

                                                                           speak clearly at an understandable pace.

Student Outcomes

Students will read a historical-fiction text to gather facts about the Battle of Baltimore and create maps that highlight important events from the War of 1812.

Summative Assessment

Students will rewrite Daniel’s report (from the book Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore) on the War of 1812 using details from the book and other sources. In the report, students will address the prompt: In the story, the author states that Daniel understood what being an American meant. What does the author mean by that statement? Cite examples from the story that support that claim.

Materials

K-W-L Chart                                                                                                                Crayons, makers or colored pencils

Daniel’s Report                                                                                                           Paper for maps and Four-Section Book

War of 1812 Map (Maryland Region)                                                                  Book for Read-Aloud: Calvert the Raven: The Battle of

Directions for Four-Section Book                                                                                                                     Baltimore by J. Scott Fuqua

Vocabulary

Tier 2 – (academic language) –cawed, whisked, bristling, plummeting, skittered

Tier 3 – (content language) – British Redcoats, muskets, bombardment, settlement, bow (of a ship), masts, hulls, fortifications,                          barricades

Prior Knowledge

Students should have a basic awareness of the Revolutionary War and America’s struggle to establish itself as a new nation.

Lesson Procedure – Day 1

 

Teacher Action:

Students Action:

Suggested Modifications:

Engagement

Create and display a K-W-L chart. Ask students to state everything that they know about the War of 1812. List that information on the “K” section of the chart.

(“K” – What I Know; “W” –What I Want to Learn or Know; “L” – What I Learned)

 

Post or distribute the report that Daniel wrote (use Teacher Resource Sheet 1).

 

Using information from Daniel’s report, have students complete the “L” column of the K-W-L chart. (Students will not be able to list any details because Daniel did not provide any information about the War of 1812. Use this opportunity to discuss why this is not a good report and what needs to be added to create a good report. )

 

Ask students what questions they still have about the War of 1812 that cannot be answered by the information already listed. Use those questions to complete the “W” column of the K-W-L chart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students participate as a class in listing everything they know about the War of 1812.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students read Daniel’s report and attempt to identify information about the War of 1812.

 

 

 

 

 

Students provide questions about the War of 1812.

If the students have previously read or studied about the War of 1812, allow them to work as partners to recall content already presented prior to the total class activity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Procedure Steps

Prior to reading the book, tell students that they are going to hear a story about a boy who is magically transported back in time to witness events that took place in Maryland during the War of 1812. Have them listen for details that could answer questions listed on the “W” section of the K-W-L chart.

 

Also, ask them to listen for specific locations/events that are mentioned in the story (List these places on the board or on chart paper: Baltimore, Battle of North Point, Washington, D.C., and Fort McHenry). While listening to the story, the students are to record information about those sites.

 

Read aloud Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore by J. Scott Fuqua. Revisit the “L” column of the K-W-L chart and list any new details learned from the book. Also check the “W” column to see if those questions have been answered.

 

Display a map of Maryland (make sure it includes Washington, D.C.)  Point out and review the elements of a map (title, border, legend/key, date, origin/author, scale). Have students locate on the map the sites mentioned in the story (Baltimore, Battle of North Point, Washington, D.C., and Fort McHenry.)

 

Distribute large sheets of white paper, markers, crayons, or colored pencils. Have students work individually or in pairs to construct maps showing the sites referenced in the story. Have them draw pictures or add captions at each site to illustrate or explain the importance of that site. Direct students to use pictures or captions not already listed on the sample map. Remind the students to include all the elements of a map.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students listen to the reading of Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore by J. Scott Fuqua and list any learned facts /information about the sites mentioned in the story.  

 

 

 

Students individually record information about the sites referenced in the story.

 

 

Students identify the elements of a map and the sites referenced in the story.

 

 

Students work individually or in pairs to construct a map of the areas referenced in the story. The maps will include pictures or captions that describe what happened at each site and should include all of the map elements.   

If copies of the book Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore by J. Scott Fuqua are available for individual or small groups of students, have students read the book. First clear vocabulary (see vocabulary list on page 1 of this plan.)

 

 

 

Use this resource with students who need additional practice in reading maps.

Maryland Historical Society:

http://www.mdhs.org/sites/default/files/How%20to%20interpret%20a%20map.pdf

 

 

Use electronic maps when available.

Mapquest Map: Use Fort McHenry-Baltimore, MD and North Point State Park, MD as the starting and ending points.

Http://www.mapquest.com/

 

Google Earth

http://www.google.com/earth/index.html

 

Note: The map included with this lesson cites places and events not cited in the book. Students can research those places and events as an extension or enrichment activity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Closure

Allow students to share their maps. (Check for accuracy and provide feedback where needed.) Display the maps in a prominent place in the room or hallway after Day 2. (Students will use the maps on Day for a story retelling activity.)

 

 

Students will share their maps with the class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Procedure – Day 2

 

Teacher Action:

Students Action:

Suggested Modifications:

Engagement

Display the map of Maryland. Revisit the locations identified on Day 1. Have students retell the story Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore by J. Scott Fuqua.

 

 

 

Students will retell the story Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore by J. Scott Fuqua.

(Have students use the maps constructed on Day 1 as props while retelling the story.)

 

Procedure Steps

Reread the book Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore and have students identify the historical figures named in the book (Major Armistead, Major General Samuel Smith, Commodore John Rodgers, and Francis Scott Key.)

 

Ask students what they would like to know about each of these historical figures pertaining to their role in the Battle of Baltimore. List those questions.

 

Have each student select one of the historical figures and have them conduct research in order to answer the questions generated by the class. Direct students to other resources (primary sources, appropriate websites, etc.)

 

Students will construct a Four-Section Book (see worksheet). Each tab will contain one of the historical figures (name or picture) and information about that person.  

 

 

 

 

Students will listen to the story Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore and record any information given about Major Armistead, Major General Samuel Smith, Commodore John Rogers, and Francis Scott Key.

 

Students will generate questions about Major Armistead, Major General Samuel Smith, Commodore John Rogers, and Francis Scott Key and their role in the Battle of Baltimore.  

 

Students will use their questions to conduct research about one of the historical figures they have selected.

 

Students will construct a Four-Section Book using information that they and their group members gathered about the 4 historical figures (Major Armistead, Major General Samuel Smith, Commodore John Rogers, and Francis Scott Key).  

 

If copies of the book Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore by J. Scott Fuqua are available for individual or small groups of students, have students reread the story and list the historical figures named.

 

 

National Park Service War of 1812 website:

http://www.nps.gov/history/1812/kids.html

 

Ft. McHenry Hold the Fort

http://www.nps.gov/fomc/holdthefort/

 

War of 1812 Map Timeline

http://warof1812.thinkport.org/#interactive-map.html

 

 

 

Closure

Have students share their reports with the class.

 

 

 

 

Students will share their reports with the class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summative Assessment

Students will rewrite Daniel’s report (from the book Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore) on the War of 1812 using details from the book and other sources.

 

*In the report, students will address this prompt:

 

In the story, the author states that Daniel understood what being an American meant. What does the author mean by that statement? Cite examples from the story that support that claim.

 

If necessary, conduct a class discussion about what they think it means to be an American. List the students’ responses as a guide.

 

 

 

 

Students will rewrite the report written by Daniel in the book Calvert the Raven: The Battle of Baltimore by J. Scott Fuqua using information gathered during this 2 day lesson. They will also address this prompt:

 

In the story, the author states that Daniel understood what being an American meant. What does the author mean by that statement? Cite examples from the story that support that claim.

 

 

 

 

Set the criteria for the report based on your school’s or district’s standards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MSDE 2013

 

     Daniel’s Report

 

 

 

     When you look back at the War of 1812, you wonder a lot of things. You wonder why somebuddy didn’t invent the camera yet so that you could see real pictures of everyone insted of paintings. And, you think everything seems a little boaring. Stories about back then put me asleep in about five seconds. So, on account of being scared of going asleep, I couldn’t not even open a book. If I could, I couldn’t of written this essay. That’s why I had to make so many things up. It’s true.

 

Instructions for a Four-Section Book

 

1.       Fold a legal size sheet of paper (preferably card stock or construction paper) in half so that it resembles a long rectangle.

 

The fold is here á

 

 

 

 

2.       Fold this long rectangle in half and then in half again so that you now have 8 squares when completely opened.  Refold the paper to the original long rectangle shape.

 

A  fold is here á

 

 

 

 

 

 

ßA  fold is here

 

 

 

 

ßA  fold is here

 

 

 

ßA  fold is here

 

 

3.       Cut the top flap only. This will leave a bottom sheet on which to record information that will be revealed when the top flap is lifted.

Top Flap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ßcut on fold on top flap only

 

 

 

ßcut on fold on top flap only

 

 

 

ßcut on fold on top flap only

Bottom Flap –DO NOT CUT ON FOLDS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.       Draw a picture or write the name of each of the historical figures on each of the top flaps. On the bottom uncut sheet write a brief description of the contribution that each made during the Battle of Baltimore.

 

Top Flap

 

Major Armistead

 

 

 

Major General Samuel Smith

 

ßLift to read information on the sheet below

 

Commodore John Rogers

 

ßLift to read information on the sheet below

 

Francis Scott Key

 

 

ßLift to read information on the sheet below

Bottom Flap

 

Major Armistead is the officer defending Fort McHenry.

 

 

 

Helped to prepare the city of Baltimore for battle.

 

Was sent out by the government to attach the ships of countries we were

fighting.

 

Wrote a song called ‘Defence of Fort McHenry’ which later became ‘The Star Spangled Banner’

Note:  Students should conduct additional research to gather more facts about these historical figures.

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